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Working together to end child labor

Millions of children worldwide are forced to forgo their educations and go to work — especially in the Asia-Pacific region. The region has the largest number of working children in the world and represents about 19 percent of the 650 million 5- to 14-year-olds in the region. In honor of World Day Against Child Labor, view the following stories of how children have left their days of child labor behind.

Photo: ©2012 Vanndeth Um/World Vision

Saven and Soa
Photo: ©2012 Vanndeth Um/World Vision

Cambodia: Saven Vong, left, forced her oldest son to quit school and work construction when he was 14. At the time, Saven thought that her children were her belongings and she should make decisions on behalf of her children. When Saven later got involved in a World Vision program, she realized her mistake. Luckily, her son returned to school, and at 23, he has earned a business degree and has an administrative job with a local company. Her youngest daughter, Soa (right), is excited to go to school. Saven now leads a self-help group in her community, educating others about children’s right to education — especially important in Cambodia, where 37 percent of children are involved in child labor.

Photo: © 2013 Mathew Mitra/World Vision

Vora Child Labor Coaching Center in Bangladesh
Photo: © 2013 Mathew Mitra/World Vision

Bangladesh: In Bangladesh, where 13 percent of children are involved in child labor, World Vision opened the Vora Child Labor Coaching Center in 2010. Centers like this allow child laborers to get a nonformal education and also learn about moral and hygiene issues. The center staff also encourages parents to allow their children to return to school. Last year 18 students enrolled in formal education programs with the mainstream school system with the center’s support.

Want to partner with us to end child labor? Support World Vision programs which further child protection and education: http://strongwomenstrongworld.org/give/.

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