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Why the Millennium Development Goals Need the Church (and Vice Versa)

Beri with children in her community in the Dominican Republic. Photo: ©2012 Abby Stalsbroten/World Vision

Beri with children in her community in the Dominican Republic.
Photo: ©2012 Abby Stalsbroten/World Vision

Earlier this week, Rich Stearns, president of World Vision US and author of Unfinished: Believing Is Only the Beginning pinpointed an apparent disconnect between Christians and some of the most important poverty-fighting efforts in the world, calling on both to fully engage with the other.

“Here’s an odd fact about many Christians that I struggle to wrap my head around. Christians care intensely about ending poverty, yet too many care little or are completely unaware of history’s most significant–and perhaps successful–efforts to end global poverty.

Over the twenty years from 1990 to 2010, the efforts of countries working to achieve the United Nation’s Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have moved 700 million people out of extreme poverty. More than 2 billion people gained access to improved drinking water, a basic necessity of life. Roughly 21 million lives have been saved by tackling malaria and tuberculosis, while the world has made significant strides in reducing hunger. All this progress came from the concerted efforts of the UN, national governments, NGOs, and private citizens and foundations.

Yet many Christians, perhaps out of a traditional American distrust of the UN and intergovernmental agencies, have seemed detached from this effort…”

Read the rest of the article here.

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